Mellanox: The World’s Most Advanced Interconnect, Pushing the Boundaries of Science and Medicine

 
Uncategorized

Each year, Earth Day—April 22—marks the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970.  Earth Day has transformed into its current status as the largest modern-day observance in the world, celebrated by more than a billion people every year, and a day of action that changes human behavior and provokes policy changes.

Earth Day is about creating change and bringing awareness to societies, that every individual has a keen responsibility to help create a greener, more sustainable future for today and for the future.

I thought to include an example in this special Earth Day blog; how Mellanox, and our high speed intelligent networking fabric, is very much a part of the efforts to advance the understanding of science; as science serves all of us and is a vital role in our daily lives.  In the most recent example, we demonstrate how Mellanox is a contributing technology in helping scientists to use state-of-the-art capabilities to assemble the 1.2 billion letter genome of the Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito, in particular carries the West Nile virus.

A team from Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new way to sequence genomes that can generate a human genome from scratch for roughly the cost of an MRI exam.  The new geonome will help scientists to better combat the spread of the West Nile virus. You can watch a short video clip on this technology.

“Taking advantage of IBM POWER8 and Mellanox InfiniBand interconnect, we are now able to change the way we assemble a genome,” said Olga Dudchenko, a postdoctoral fellow at The Center for Genome Architecture at Baylor College of Medicine. “And while we originally created Voltron to sequence the human genome, the method can be applied to a dizzying array of species. This gives us an opportunity to explore mosquitoes, which carry diseases that impact many people around the globe.”


“Taking advantage of IBM POWER8 and Mellanox InfiniBand interconnect, we are now able to change the way we assemble a genome,” said Olga Dudchenko, a postdoctoral fellow at The Center for Genome Architecture at Baylor College of Medicine. “And while we originally created Voltron to sequence the human genome, the method can be applied to a dizzying array of species. This gives us an opportunity to explore mosquitoes, which carry diseases that impact many people around the globe.”


A new high performance computing (HPC) system dubbed, “VOLTRON,” which is based on network capabilities from Mellanox, and the latest IBM Power Systems platform, provides the scalable HPC capabilities necessary to accommodate a broad spectrum of data-enabled research activities. Baylor College of Medicine joins leading supercomputing agencies globally – the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore National Labs and the U.K. government’s Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Hartree Centre – that have selected these technologies for cutting-edge HPC research.

We couldn’t be more proud to participate in the efforts of Earth Day, all year round!  Even if our role is somewhat less known in larger scheme of things, it is as equally important.  At Mellanox, we continue to improve upon the most advanced high speed interconnect solutions for both InfiniBand and Ethernet, and our technology helps to push the boundaries of science and data to achieve a better understanding of who we are while improving the quality of life for generations to come.

About Scot Schultz

Scot Schultz is a HPC technology specialist with broad knowledge in operating systems, high speed interconnects and processor technologies. Joining the Mellanox team in March 2013 as Director of HPC and Technical Computing, Schultz is 25-year veteran of the computing industry. Prior to joining Mellanox, he spent the past 17 years at AMD in various engineering and leadership roles, most recently in strategic HPC technology ecosystem enablement. Scot was also instrumental with the growth and development of the Open Fabrics Alliance as co-chair of the board of directors. Scot currently maintains his role as Director of Educational Outreach, founding member of the HPC Advisory Council and of various other industry organizations. Follow him on Twitter: @ScotSchultz

Leave a Reply